concussions

Anisocoria: One Pupil Larger Than the Other

Sarah Quinn Articles, Conditions, Eye Health Comments Off , , , , ,

In last month’s blog post on how a concussion affects vision, we discussed that having one pupil larger than the other is a cause for concern if you’ve recently suffered a concussion. This month, we’re going to take a deeper dive into that condition, known as Anisocoria.

Causes

Anisocoria naturally affects about one-fifth of the population without any problems in vision. Outside of being born with the condition, most people who are affected by it usually have had an eye disorder of some sort or an issue with their nervous system.

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Photo from The Express UK Article on David Bowie

According to the Merk Manual, eye disorders include birth defects, injuries to the eye, drugs, inflammation of the pupil itself, or are glaucoma-related. The late David Bowie, a well-known British musician and icon, is an excellent example of anisocoria. Most people think he had different colored eyes, a condition known as heterochromia, but he did, in fact, have anisocoria as a result of being hit in the eye as a teenager. To learn more about that story, here’s the link to The Express UK article on David Bowie.

Sometimes there are issues with the nervous system that result in one pupil being larger than the other. Those issues include pressure on the 3rd cranial nerve (nerve affecting the movement of the eye), stroke, injury, tumors, infections, or problems with the autonomic nervous system that result in drooping eyelids and misaligned eyes.

Symptoms to Watch For

See a medical professional if you experience any of the following and your pupils suddenly appear to be different sizes:

    • Drooping eyelid 
    • Double vision
    • Loss of vision
    • Headache or neck pain
    • Eye pain with bright light
    • Recent injury to the head or eye

 

Treatment

Eye-care professionals will first take a look at your history — and even perhaps an old photograph or your driver’s license — to see if anisocoria has been present all along. Then they will perform a series of examinations to make sure that both of your eyes are tracking correctly, responding to light and dark appropriately, and will use a slit lamp to magnify your eye for further examination.

While there isn’t anything that can be done to treat the condition itself, there may be a need and/or opportunities to treat the underlying condition that is resulting in anisocoria.

For more information on this condition, check out All About Vision, the Merk Manual for Professionals, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


How a Concussion Affects Vision

Sarah Quinn Articles, Conditions, Eye Safety Comments Off , ,

A concussion, also known as a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI), happens when you get hit in the head hard enough that it bruises the brain. While not typically life-threatening, a blow to the head can leave you with headaches, dizziness, fatigue, vomiting (in more severe cases), and vision problems.

Causes of Concussions

The Centers for Disease Control says that the majority of concussions — around 47 percent — happen after a fall (off a bike, missteps, etc.). Being struck by an object (baseballs, football tackle, etc.) account for around 15 percent of mTBIs. While 14 percent happen as a result of a motor vehicle accident.

Symptoms of a Concussion

Common symptoms of a concussion are headaches, dizziness, vomiting, and at least initially, blurred vision and light sensitivity. Unlike the other symptoms, which can happen shortly after the blow, vision problems, as noted by All About Vision, can actually show up later and may not present themselves right away. So, you need to be on the lookout for them throughout the healing process.

For further reading, the Brain Injury Association of America has provided information on this condition.

Red CrossPlease note: It is a medical emergency and a strong indicator of severe trauma if one pupil (dark dot in the center of the eye) appears larger than the other. You must go to the Emergency Room straight away to be seen by a medical professional.

Vision Problems to Watch For

According to BrainInjuries.org and the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association, concussions can trigger many vision issues. They are:

NEURO-OPTOMETRIC REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION

Graphic Provided by Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association

    • Blurred or fuzzy vision
    • Light sensitivity
    • Reading difficulties
    • Comprehension problems
    • Double vision
    • Aching eyes
    • Headaches when tending to visual tasks
    • Visual-field loss
    • Eye movement issues such as tracking, shifting focus, and binocular focusing

If left untreated, the concussed patient may begin to have trouble making sense of visual information, so it is important to remain vigilant for at least a month after getting an mTBI to watch for these other symptoms.

Treatments

The single best thing you can do after receiving a concussion is to rest and avoid environments where you may re-injure yourself while you are healing. The brain takes a few weeks to recover. If it is determined that your vision has been affected, there are various optometric vision therapies and vision rehabilitation therapies that can help. Talk with your eye-care professional for recommendations on which therapy would work best for you.